Discouragement and Isolation in the Name of Education

(The Case for Homeschooling High School)

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As someone in the homeschooling community who is very vocal in my criticism of the public education system, there are pretty many comments I hear time and again.

One of these comments is the notion that parents may, indeed, be capable of homeschooling elementary age children, but they just couldn’t possibly be equipped to homeschool high school.

I beg to differ.  Continue reading “Discouragement and Isolation in the Name of Education”

Helping Your Teen Find Balance Between Work and Homeschool

The answer might surprise you!

Homeschooling through high school can seem like a pretty intimidating prospect. Add in a homeschooled teen with a job, and you’re opening a whole other can of worms.

Homeschooling a teen with a job opens a whole other can of worms.

Fear not!

I’m going to offer you a bit of advice today that goes against the grain of your typical homeschooling circles.  Continue reading “Helping Your Teen Find Balance Between Work and Homeschool”

Our 2018/2019 Relaxed Homeschool Curriculum for High School

Well, here it is – my final post dedicated to presenting next year’s homeschool curriculum.

As with our chosen curriculum for the littles and middles, my teenagers’ (who will be in grades 9 and 11) learning remains as relaxed as possible, which I know really goes against the grain when it comes to most homeschooled high schoolers.

The thing is, last year I graduated my first homeschooler, and that experience really helped me to realize that I’m far more interested in preparing my kids to become adults than I am in stuffing them with trivial facts and dates. So if you’re looking for a vast array of textbook selections, you won’t find that here. 😉  Continue reading “Our 2018/2019 Relaxed Homeschool Curriculum for High School”

The Surprising Truth About Homeschooling High School

This post wasn’t in my plans for today.

You see, earlier this afternoon, I was actually mentally preparing to record a video presenting next year’s relaxed homeschool high school curriculum. It suddenly dawned on me that, at first glance, most people will likely think my teenagers won’t be “doing enough.” After all, isn’t high school the time to start cracking down on academics and getting “serious” about learning?

A few years ago, I would have said yes. But that was before I actually had a homeschool graduate.

Like most homeschool parents, the thought of educating my kids through high school was pretty intimidating. I had the resolve to do it, but I wasn’t sure how. By default, I decided to follow the traditional school model of education. (Looking back, I honestly don’t know what I was thinking.)  Continue reading “The Surprising Truth About Homeschooling High School”

Our 2017/2018 Relaxed Homeschool Curriculum for 10th and 12th Grade

Don’t you just love back-to-homeschool time? Everywhere you turn, excited moms are sharing their plans for the new school year. It is such an awesome experience to see how different homeschooling can look from house to house, and how, despite the differences, they’re all equally impressive.

Today I though I’d share what I have in store for my 15 and 17 year old. I will admit that these choices aren’t set in stone- but then again, nothing in homeschool should be, right? Another thing I’ll also point out is that, although I have them “labeled” as 10th and 12th grade students, I don’t actually use a single resource that is grade level specific.

Not one. To me, grade levels are just an arbitrary holdover from traditional school. In fact, we only use them so that:

  • our kids know which Sunday School class to attend, and
  • because our school district assigns them grade levels in their records, anyway.

So, with that being said, let’s get started!  Continue reading “Our 2017/2018 Relaxed Homeschool Curriculum for 10th and 12th Grade”

Homeschooling High School with College in Mind- Review

This year we will have our very first homeschool graduate. It’s an exciting time, albeit a bit stressful because this is uncharted territory for us. There have been moments of serenity where I’ve thought, I’ve got this, and others when I’ve panicked and convinced myself that I had no idea what I was doing.  Continue reading “Homeschooling High School with College in Mind- Review”

How to Homeschool Simply (The Teen Years)

Ages 14-18

I’ve now reached the final week in this series- homeschooling during the teen years. In case you missed the previous posts, over the past few weeks I’ve written about how to simply homeschool:

Today I’ll be finishing up with how to accomplish a relaxed homeschooling atmosphere while homeschooling teenagers.  Continue reading “How to Homeschool Simply (The Teen Years)”

An Inside Look at Our Relaxed Homeschool- The Teens

I’ve been covering our relaxed homeschool methods for the past two weeks, and although I’ve already written about the littles and the middles, my teens give the best description of what relaxed homeschooling is actually all about.

This year I have three teens- 14, 16, and 17 years old- and they couldn’t be more different from one another. Because of this, I don’t group them together for their learning. They each have their own individual learning style, and I’ve found that our homeschool is the most efficient when we can support them in the way that fits each of them the best.  Continue reading “An Inside Look at Our Relaxed Homeschool- The Teens”

How to Homeschool High School English Simply and Effectively

Homeschooling high school can seem like an intimidating prospect. Homeschooling, high school simply, however, turns a potentially daunting task into one in which not only much learning occurs, but a love of learning prospers.  Continue reading “How to Homeschool High School English Simply and Effectively”

Sometimes the Best Teachers Don’t Need a Degree

Worried about your qualifications as a homeschool, or future homeschool, parent? Join me as I discuss the characteristics of great homeschool parents!

teacher
Image courtesy of khunaspix at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Two years ago when my daughter was seeking a scholarship for a local art school, I had a somewhat uncomfortable conversation. In the midst of the interview, the subject of homeschooling came up. The registrar looked at me quizzingly and asked, “Do you have an education degree?” I replied that I did not; they aren’t necessary for homeschooling in PA. She grew completely perplexed and replied, “But how do you teach things you don’t know?”

This question caught me rather off-guard for two reasons:

  1. I had honestly never even thought about it, and
  2. Does having a degree automatically mean you know how to do everything?

The registrar is not alone in asking this question. In fact, the idea of a parent not being qualified to teach his or her children has crossed the minds of many would-be homeschoolers and scared them away from ever going through with their dreams of homeschooling.

Realistically, however, most homeschool routines don’t even remotely resemble a typical school day, so the qualifications needed in a traditional classroom are somewhat different than those necessary in an at-home setting.

My hope here is to encourage those of you who are doubting your ability to homeschool by listing the characteristics of a successful homeschool parent because, as you will see, they are probably nothing at all like the typical idea of what an average teacher looks like.

(This post contains affiliate links. Please see my full disclosure policy.)

A great homeschool teacher will:

1.Receive questions with open arms. Unlike traditional school teachers who must often stick to a script, homeschoolers have the freedom of drifting away from a discussion or lesson if more intriguing ponderings arise. Just today I was reading Madeline with my younger children. A book that would normally take five minutes turned into a twenty minute discussion about Paris, old telephones, appendixes, scars, nuns, steamboats, and- my children’s favorite- retellings of their own experiences with hospital visits. A discussion like this would most likely not have happened within a school setting because of, among other things, time constraints, but at home we have the freedom to explore ideas with our kids as they arise. Questions are a blessing. Delight in inquisitiveness!

2.Encourage their children to learn how to discover answers for themselves. While it is, of course, necessary to help your children when the need arises, it is also so important to help children learn where and how to find resources for themselves. Although my children and I visit the library regularly, the other week I took them there for the main purpose of explaining the Dewey Decimal System to them and taking them on a tour of where to find specific types of books. Giving them opportunities to research online is also something that is necessary in this day and age. I know that many parents have mixed feelings about Google, but I consider it to be hugely beneficial to our learning endeavors.

3.Give their children plenty of time for exploring interests. Some of the most crucial and most important learning does not come from books, but from life. Learn to see the world through your children’s eyes, instead of through the schoolish lenses most of us possess, and you will find value in just about everything your children do. Keep in mind that the hobbies of your children now may well be training for their future. Kids who like to play school may become teachers, and those who insist on taking everything apart to see how it works are likely to be budding engineers. If your children are actively exploring life, there is no such thing as wasted time.

4.Have a plan for those occasions when they don’t know how to help with a certain subject. As the saying goes, the world is our oyster when it comes to information and resources in this day and age. The most common piece of advice for situations like this is to hire a tutor, but many one-income (and some two-income families!) simply cannot afford it. Thankfully, there are plenty of other options for getting help with those difficult areas. A short sampling would be:

-the library

-friends, neighbors, and family members

Khan Academy

-the good, old internet

YouTube

The options are really endless. Just keep an open mind about how learning happens, and you’d be amazed where the help can come from!

5.Let their children have a say in what they’re learning about. Think about it. Can you concentrate on something you have no interest in and no need for? Me neither. My older children all give input on what their learning plan will consist of. My oldest daughter loves psychology and will be taking it for a third time next year (her senior year). This could never have happened at our public high school, as they only offer one half-year course on it. Why force her to take a Social Studies credit that she’s never going to need in real life? It just doesn’t make sense. I guarantee your kids will put more effort into work they consider to be useful and interesting.

6.Know when something isn’t working and be willing to change it. Sometimes a particular curriculum may look phenomenal to us parents, but when our children set out to doing it, they don’t feel the same way. If your child is struggling to the point of tears or complete apathy, it’s time to ditch the book and move on. This is one of those other areas that homeschoolers have the advantage. Since public schools have limited budgets and slews of students to purchase textbooks for, they don’t have the option of doing this. While I certainly do remember trudging through those dry textbooks in high school, I don’t remember one important thing out of any of them. I know sometimes it may seem like a waste to discontinue something you paid for, but it is so much more important that your children can learn well. Unused curriculum can easily be saved for younger siblings (maybe they’ll like it!), sold to other homeschoolers, or even given away for free to a family with a limited income.

7.Drop everything they know about “school” and design a plan that works for their family. I want you to close your eyes and remember what your school days were like. Crowded hallways. Cramped desks. Bathroom passes. Ringing bells. Do you have a clear picture? Now, push that picture out of your head because homeschooling does not have to be like that. Observe your children. Take notice to how they do things and what they spend the most time on. Only you can decide what is right for your family. And I’m here to tell you that you may not get it right the first time. Or the second. Or the third. 🙂 All kidding aside, you will figure it out, and your children will thank you for it.

I was going to title this post “What Makes a Great Homeschool Teacher” but decided against it because, to many of us, homeschooling doesn’t feel like teaching. It feels like life. It feels like family. It feels like love. That is what it takes to make a great homeschool parent. Are you qualified?

 

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