A Tale of Ten Homeschoolers- Back to “School”!

We’ve reached the end of our first week of our new homeschool year, and we have had so much fun! The kids and I were all so excited to begin, and that has lasted throughout the entire week, so things are looking great so far!

Unfortunately, we almost got off to a rocky start because I got a phone call early Monday morning from a family member asking me to drive them somewhere (they live 1/2 hr. away). After I explained that it was our first day of homeschool, they were very understanding. Unfortunately, though, when I mentioned it to another family member I was lectured about sometimes “having to make sacrifices.” I got more than a little angry at that, because I have sacrificed many a homeschool day to help people out. The problem is that once I started doing that, people have constantly been expecting me to do it over and over again.  Continue reading “A Tale of Ten Homeschoolers- Back to “School”!”

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Is Homeschooling Really All That Different from School?

Sometimes I feel like a broken record.

broken record
Image courtesy of anankkml at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

 

I have made it my passion to let people know how different homeschooling is from school, but it feels like it’s falling on deaf ears. Maybe it’s because people have just been so completely brainwashed immersed in what education is supposed to look like that they just can’t picture it any other way than that of the traditional school setting.  Continue reading “Is Homeschooling Really All That Different from School?”

How to Joyfully Transition from Home to Homeschool

“My concern is not to improve “education” but to do away with it, to end the ugly and antihuman business of people-shaping and let people shape themselves.”
– John Holt, Instead of Education

transition to homeschool
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At first glance, the title of this post may seem redundant. If my children have never been in school, why would we need to transition into homeschooling? It may, indeed, seem a silly proposal, but hear me out…..

Children are natural learners. Just watch any child that is pre-school age, and you’re bound to see someone who is itching to find out as much as she can about the world and wants to do it independently and immediately. Your child has been learning since birth. Naturally. Spontaneously. Voluntarily.  Continue reading “How to Joyfully Transition from Home to Homeschool”

Lazy Day Links- 6/24/16

lazy day links
Image courtesy of porbital at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

My kids spent the week at VBS, and I feel like I was the one running around all week. We just returned from the closing picnic, where I spent over 2 hours trying to keep track of 7 kids, and I am exhausted.

So, without further ado, let’s get on with this week’s links!

My Favorite Posts:

The Orwellian Charge of the Campus Bias Response Team– National Review

Objections to Homeschooling: “I won’t have enough time to myself.”– Intoxicated on Life

45 Ways to Define Homeschool Curriculum- Is Your Definition Holding You Back?– Tina’s Dynamic Homeschool Plus

Our First Bloom Night– Happy Hearts Homeschool

Homeschool Requires Commitment– Homegrown Learners

 

Posts You May Have Missed:

Why Should We Homeschool?- Part 10- Following Your Own Schedule

How to Peacefully Transition Your Child from School to Homeschool

Homeschooling Methods: An Overview of the Relaxed Approach

Keeping It Simple: How I Homeschool 10 Children

Hope Unfolding: Grace-Filled Truth for the Momma’s Heart, by Becky Thompson

 

(This post contains affiliate links.)

Books Worth Reading/ Movies Worth Watching:

1984– George Orwell

Fahrenheit 451– Ray Bradbury

The Giver– Lois Lowry

The Giver (movie)

The Adventures of Ociee Nash (movie)

 

That’s it for this week. Have a great weekend!

A Tale of Ten Homeschoolers- VBS & a Pleasant Surprise

homeschool surprise
Image courtesy of Mister GC at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

This has been one busy week for my preteens and youngsters. Since Monday, they’ve been attending an all-day VBS program at the neighborhood playground, sponsored by our church and a few others. My kids who have never set foot in school are getting a good idea of just how long a school day is. They start at 9:30 am with a sports program led by Fellowship of Christian Athletes and Push the Rock. They take a break at 12pm for lunch (provided by VBS) , and then resume with VBS activities from 12:30-3pm. My kids have attended now for several years; in fact, this program is how we ended up at our church in the first place. Every year my kids count down the days until it’s time for “Light in the Park.” It’s an amazing evangelism opportunity, as there aren’t a whole lot of Christian families in this neighborhood.

Unfortunately, my 3 and 5 yr. olds are still too young to attend, so they’ve been spending the week playing together, although they both really want to go with their older siblings!

This past Monday, I officially became a blog contributor at They Call Me Blessed. I am so excited to have the opportunity to work with such a great group of bloggers. I wrote about how our family manages homeschooling with ten learners. I really wrote it out in detail, so if you’re interested in how our days go, I definitely encourage you to check it out!

By now you’re probably wondering what our pleasant surprise is…no, I’m not pregnant. (I’m sure some of you may have been thinking that.)

On Tuesday I had to take two of my daughters for their physicals, and we had a new physician’s assistant. The fact that we homeschool eventually came up, and she asked me what curriculum we use. I started stammering because it’s just not that simple for us; our curriculum comes from about 50 different resources. When she saw I was getting flustered she said,

“I was asking because we’re in our second year of homeschooling, and I was interested in what curriculum a homeschool veteran uses. Did you think I was asking you to find out if your kids were learning everything they should be?”

I breathed a huge sigh of relief and said that yes, I did, and it wouldn’t have been the first time. She laughed, and we had a really pleasant conversation about homeschooling and curriculum. Before we left, I gave her the name of my evaluator and the web address for my blog. *Smile* It was a good day.

I know this is a really short post today, but since the older kids were at my mom’s most of the week, and most of my other kids were at VBS, we didn’t do a whole lot of interesting stuff. Such is life, right?

And because our week was so, well, boring, I’ve only got a couple of pictures for you today.

kids doing crafts
Making gifts for VBS crew leaders
playing with shopkins
My kids love their Shopkins!

Please excuse the poor quality of these photos. My kids lost the battery to my camera a while back, and I never got around to replacing it, so I’m stuck using my cheap phone. I guess that’s what I get for letting the kids use my camera!

Tomorrow is the closing picnic for VBS. It’s always so nice. It’s more like a block party than a picnic. They give out free hot dogs, Italian ices, and drinks, and they have a bounce house and huge inflatable slides. It’s a lot of fun.

Oh, and one more thing…18 days until we start our homeschool again. Yay!

How was your week?

How to Peacefully Transition Your Child from School to Homeschool

Here’s What You Need to Know…

Whether you have decided to homeschool from the get-go or are removing your children from school, this decision is one of the biggest, most important resolutions you will ever make. The notion of being responsible for your child’s education can seem daunting and stressful, but so exciting.

Once the choice has been made, the first thing most new homeschoolers think is, “Where do I go from here?” The answer to that question may look different depending upon what your pre-homeschooling situation looks like.  Continue reading “How to Peacefully Transition Your Child from School to Homeschool”

Lazy Day Links-6/17/16

lazy day links
Image courtesy of porbital at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

The longer this break continues, the antsier and antsier I get to start school again. I am so excited to see what this new year will bring. I have to chuckle at this point-of-view because while most parents can’t wait to send their kids back to school, I can’t wait to do school with them. Homeschooling is amazing.

On to this week’s links!

My Favorite Posts:

It Takes a Parent, Not a Policy– National Review

Sammy Rhodes: Stop Genuflecting and Preach the Gospel– Timothy J. Hammons

What Can We Preach to Orlando?– Timothy J. Hammons

My Biggest Homeschool Regret– My Little Poppies

Homeschool Regrets: What I’d Go Back and Change– Life at the Table

 

Posts You May Have Missed:

Dear Leftists, You’ve Got It All Wrong!!

My Word for 2014 (Even Though I Had No Plans to Jump on the Bandwagon)

Tailoring a Homeschool Curriculum to Fit Your Child (And Not the Other Way Around)

Why Should We Homeschool?- Part 8- Learning from Life

Why Should We Homeschool?- Part 9- Socialization

 

(This post contains affiliate links.)

Books Worth Reading:

Hope Unfolding- Grace-Filled Truth for the Momma’s Heart– Becky Thompson

The Spiritual Warfare Answer Book– Dr. David Jeremiah

Give Your Child the World-Jamie C. Martin

A Flower Blooms on Charlotte Street– Milam McGraw Propst

The Year of Learning Dangerously: Adventures in Homeschooling– Quinn Cummings

 

That’s it for this week. Next week I’m considering adding some good family movies in with the books to add some variety. What do you think? Any suggestions?

 

There’s No Place Like Home is now on Facebook and Pinterest!

 

 

An Open Letter to the New Homeschooler I Met Today

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Image courtesy of fantasista at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Dear Homeschool Parent,

I ran into you today as I was dropping off our homeschool evaluations at the school district. As I walked in, the secretary looked at me with relief and said, “She homeschools!” Remember me?

First off, I want to say congratulations on making the decision to take the reins on your child’s education. Honestly, there’s no better time to pull your kids out of school than in this day and age we are in right now.

Before the secretary saw me come in, I heard her telling you to hire an out-of-district teacher to help you find curriculum. I wanted to jump in front of you and scream, “No! Don’t!” but I had to compose myself because, after all, we were in the school administration building. Frankly, I was relieved when she turned your attention to me and tried to enlist me to help you. While I did give you some very basic information, the name of my evaluator, and some helpful websites (including mine!), I was dying inside because I couldn’t help you the way I wanted to. Not there. Not while the school employee was standing there listening to us.

I can only hope that you’ll soon type in my web address and find this post here just for you because here is where I will have the freedom to say what needs to be said. It’s not that I don’t trust the school district. I do, but they are school employees and probably don’t understand what homeschooling is all about. So here is what I wanted to say to you then and there:

-Don’t ask people at the school district for help with homeschooling. They likely don’t know any more than you do, and in fact, may well know even less. As school employees, they have been trained in the methods used in the public school setting, which is fine, but homeschooling is nothing like school– at least, it shouldn’t be. It is for this reason that I would strongly recommend that you would not ask a school teacher for help with your curriculum. Don’t get me wrong. There are lots of teachers who homeschool, but the vast majority do not and don’t understand what it’s all about. If you need help, there are so many great homeschooling books and websites out there. Google is your friend. 🙂

Don’t ask people at the school district about homeschool laws. Speaking from experience, they do not fully understand them, which is why it is so important that we as homeschooling parents do. Do your research. Visit the website I gave you that explains the law. Ask other homeschoolers. The problem is that if you don’t know the law and rely on the school district for information, they are likely to require more information than they legally should which will, in turn, cause problems for other homeschoolers. Our state laws were recently changed so that the only thing now required to give to the school district is our homeschool evaluation letter. That’s it. Yet, last year the district tried to get our standardized test scores, as well. Thankfully, I knew they were not entitled to them and told them so. Interestingly, I noticed that the paper they hand out still asks for test scores. I’m assuming that’s for homeschoolers who don’t know better. I truly think this is just another way for them to have control over us. If you know the law, this won’t happen.

The first thing you asked me about was where to find curriculum. I’m here to tell you that that’s the last thing you should worry about. I wasn’t comfortable saying that in the school building because sometimes people fear what they don’t understand, and I didn’t want the employee jumping to conclusions. But honestly, just spend time with your kids. Watch how they do things. Look for what interests them. This is how you can choose your curriculum. You just may discover that your child will do better with library books than with textbooks. Remember, textbooks are not mandatory. They are simply a tool for learning that often aren’t a great fit for most kids.

As the homeschool facilitator, it is up to you what your children will learn. Homeschoolers do not have to follow the school itinerary, although some choose to. You had expressed concern about knowing whether or not you were on track with what you would be teaching. If you are teaching something that you and your children find valuable, then you are on track. There are very few things specified about what we must cover (PA history, US history, fire safety, etc.) I don’t even go out of my way to address these issues because these are topics that come up in day to day living and don’t need any additional materials other than a newspaper, a discussion with you, or reminders about the dangers of fire. You certainly don’t need to waste your money on a curriculum for them, unless your child is so interested that it would be worth it. And even if they are, there are many free printables online on so many different things. You’d be amazed.

In closing, I just want to wish you the best on what can potentially be an awesome journey. Just keep reminding yourself that homeschooling is not school at home, and you’ll be on your way. Maybe someday we’ll run into each other again. Until then, enjoy the ride!

Shelly

 

There’s No Place Like Home is now on Facebook and Pinterest!

 

A No-Nonsense Guide to Homeschooling

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Deciding to homeschool for the first time can be a scary thing. Whether you’ve decided before your children have ever set foot in a school or have resolved to pull your children from their current schools, the world of home education can seem like an intimidating and confusing situation to find yourself in. In the past year, I’ve had quite a few frazzled mothers ask me the question, “How do I homeschool?”

That question in itself can be answered in so many different ways because there are so many different ways to homeschool, so I’ve narrowed it down to, “What should I do as a new homeschooler?”

That question is a bit simpler and a bit more relevant for those new to the journey. Let me start to answer this query by telling you what not to do.

If I was only given the opportunity to tell you one thing about homeschooling, it would be this: Do not plunge head-first into a school-at-home routine from the very beginning. Just don’t do it. Seriously. I promise you, it will bring you more heartache than joy.

Let me emphasize that I said, “…from the very beginning.” After finding out more about how your children like to learn, you may well decide that this is the best method for you. But I implore you, please do not do it by default using the reasoning that “this is how it’s done in government schools.” Think about it. Why would you try to reproduce something that isn’t working?

The second thing I would tell you not to do is to run out and spend a ton of money on curriculum. If you are new to this, you probably aren’t familiar with how your children prefer to approach things. Watch them. Observe them. Interact with them. Once you’ve spent some time intentionally paying attention to the way in which your kids do things, you will have a much better idea of what will benefit them the most.

So what should you do? Live a full life with them. Go to the library often. Enjoy the park, the bike trail, and the creek down the street. Read to them. Take them with you on your errands and explain to them what you’re doing and why. Bake cookies for the elderly neighbor or the librarians who, more than likely, will soon become indispensible to you.

Keep your eyes open for resources that sometimes seemingly fall into your lap. When we first began homeschooling, I used everything from pamphlets from the electric company (science and safety) to newspapers (current events) to keep my children engaged until we had a more concrete plan in place.

Find out what they’re interested in and provide opportunities for your children to pursue them. If they like to cook, cook with them. If they’re natural artists, buy some good quality art supplies and/or look into a local art class. (The art school that my children attended actually have a class specifically for homeschoolers.) If reptiles are their thing, visit a reptile house or check out one of many awesome documentaries on Netflix or YouTube. Use your imagination to come up with ways to support your children’s hobbies. With the internet and the library as resources, you can literally find information on anything.

And while you’re accomplishing all of this for your kids, spend some time reading about and researching learning styles, and homeschool approaches and philosophies. Check the end of this post for a list of great resources I’ve used.

(This post contains affiliate links.)

If there is anything I would recommend that you purchase from the get-go, it would be:

-lots of paper, writing utensils, and arts and crafts supplies

-a deck of cards, a pack of dice, and some board games

-a map or a globe

-a library card (this is free, but it’s a must-have)

-and, if it really bothers you that your kids aren’t doing “schoolwork,” some spelling/phonics and math workbooks at Barnes and Noble (make sure you apply for the educator’s discount!), Five Below, or, depending on the ages of your kids, Dollar Tree.

Some people begin their homeschool journey doing activities like these and find that it is enough for them and continue to do so. Others, over time, may transition towards other types of learning methods that appeal to them and are very successful with them.

What’s most important is to ease into this lifestyle. Homeschooling can be a rewarding and exhilarating way of life, so remember to sit back, relax, and enjoy the ride.

 

Homeschool Resources

Learning All the Time

Free Range Learning: How Homeschooling Changes Everything

The Homeschooling Handbook

Teach Your Own- The John Holt Book of Homeschooling

 

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