Schools Are Asking 5th Graders WHAT??

The other day, one of my subscribers messaged me and expressed her concern over a survey her daughter had to complete at school last week. She included a link to an article about it. I was horrified.
It seems that lately schools have been working at a fever pitch to not only indoctrinate children, but to sexualize them.

Parents, if your kids are in school, you have to be vigilant. Better yet, if at all possible, save them and get them out of school NOW. Do you honestly think they’ll get any better? Experience tells us they’ll only get worse.

Public School or Government School? Which Is More Accurate?

Ever since the State of the Union Address, there has been a raging debate going on over whether taxpayer-funded schools are public schools or government schools.

I actually was surprised at the reaction of people to President Trump’s reference to them as “government schools.” (Some people are downright offended by it.) I’ve heard of them referred to as government schools for years, and I thought it was simply synonymous with “public schools.”

Aren’t they the same thing? Does it matter what they’re called? After pondering it for awhile, I’ve realized the answer to that is: It’s complicated.

In today’s video, after much thought on the matter, I delve into which term is actually more accurate.

Homeschool vs. Public School

I know, I know. I say all the time that school and homeschool are two different things. But for those who don’t know much about homeschooling, they might have a hard time understanding what that means.

In today’s video I shared a side-by-side comparison of how schools approach certain things, such as curriculum, learning differences, family vacations, etc., and how these same things can be approached in a home educating family.

Public Education and the Hidden Curriculum Part 7: ONE CAN’T HIDE

Today I made another Patreon video public. 🤗

If you’re even slightly acquainted with Orwell’s 1984, then you’ve most likely heard the expression “Big Brother is watching you,” and it couldn’t be more true today.

One thing people tend to forget, though, is that the public education system is another arm of Big Brother, and make no mistake about it – surveillance is another aspect of the hidden curriculum.

Public Schools Have No Business Promoting Mindfulness

About a month ago, several people started sending me messages about mindfulness and meditation being taught in public schools. As troubling as I found it, I had no idea it was this widespread.There are actual mindfulness curriculums being marketed for schools. I cannot tell you on how many levels this is not okay.

AR Reading Is Garbage and Common Core Is a Joke

Yesterday I gained some personal insight into AR Reading and Common Core math.

It wasn’t pretty.

(This post contains affiliate links.)

For an excellent documentary on the Common Core method, I highly recommend Escaping Common Core.

10 Things I Don’t Miss About Public School

A homeschool mom’s reflections on her children’s time in public school

If you live in the northern hemisphere, chances are that summer break is here! As always, I’m seeing so many different reactions from parents about this time of year. Some are relieved and happy to have their kids home for a couple months. Some are feeling overwhelmed and are scrambling to figure out how to keep their kids occupied for the next 12 weeks. And still others are, unfortunately, trying to overcome the obstacles that have been thrown before them (NY and CA, I’m looking at you) and are trying to figure out what will become of their children’s education once summer is over.

Continue reading “10 Things I Don’t Miss About Public School”

Christian Kids Need a Christian Education

“He who controls the schools, controls the world.”
-Voddie Baucham

(Today’s post was inspired by Voddie Baucham’s “Children of Caesar.” For more information on this topic, visit exodusmandate.org)

Today I’m going to be upfront about something a lot of my fellow believers don’t want to hear:

Continue reading “Christian Kids Need a Christian Education”

The Most Dangerous Back-to-School Advice I’ve Ever Seen

A few days ago, I happened to see a screenshot of some back-to-school advice that someone shared. Written specifically for the parents of those registering their kids for kindergarten, I have no reservations about the fact that the author meant well.

However.

I was appalled and astonished to see that this advice proved what I was saying the other week about the schools usurping parental authority This post, on the other hand, is suggesting that you hand it over willingly.

No usurpation required.

 

 

 

The Top Ten Reasons I Homeschool

How our experience with public school affected our decision to homeschool

I know that “Reasons Why I Homeschool” posts are a dime a dozen, but this particular list will refer specifically to how our experience with public school affected this decision. I could probably list more than ten reasons, but for the sake of time I’m going to limit myself.

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1. My children can learn about what interests them, and God is never a taboo subject at home.

When Arianna was in 2nd grade, her teacher asked the children for examples of authority figures. One child answered ”God” and was told that since not everyone believes in God, she couldn’t include Him as an authority figure.

What kind of a message is that to children being raised in Christian homes? At home they’re taught about the sovereignty of God, and at school they’re taught (often by teachers that they assume know everything) that God has no position of authority.

2. We don’t have to wake up at the crack of dawn and rush around to get ten children dressed and ready for school.

I know what you’re thinking…get everything ready the night before! In theory, this sounds wonderful, but in practice, it’s laughable. Have you ever heard of Murphy’s Law- if anything can go wrong, it will? Yeah, well, my house is a prime example to the validity of that. I could have all the clothes, shoes, and backpacks neatly lined up and ready, and without fail, something would still be missing when it was time to leave!

3. We don’t have to walk to and from school in inclement weather.

We’re a one-car family, so every morning I would have to bundle up a baby and two toddlers to walk the other children to school in all kinds of weather- heavy rain, snow, freezing temperatures…you name it.

4. I don’t have to report to anyone when one (or all) of my children is sick.

I understand the concept behind this…I really do, but when I’ve got eight kids throwing up, the last thing I’m thinking of is calling the attendance office.

5. I don’t have to worry about unexcused absences.

When Caollin was in kindergarten, I was pregnant with Ireland. At the end of my pregnancy, I had to go in for non-stress tests 2-3 times a week. I would often take her with me and then drop her off at afternoon kindergarten. The one day, the doctor was concerned and had me stay on the monitor longer because the baby wasn’t very reactive. I called the school to tell them that Caollin wouldn’t be at school that day. I explained the situation and the fact that Caollin was with me, and I couldn’t leave. The secretary then proceeded to tell me this would be an unexcused absence because it wasn’t Caollin’s appointment!

6. There is no crazy time when the kids all arrive home.

I love my kids to death, but I used to dread when they would all come home from school because they would act completely nuts! There would be screaming, fighting, backpacks and jackets thrown everywhere, papers strewn all over the place…it was bad.

7. There is no homework.

I know that technically, everything in homeschool, even play, is considered home work, but this is different. The kids used to all approach me for homework help at the same – and it was frustrating because I would have no idea what they had learned all day. Algebra homework was the worst with my daughter because, I swear, the school must have bought the cheapest textbooks available because her book had no explanation of how to do anything! The teacher didn’t help matters, either, because she would only check to see if the students did their homework (they probably could have written anything); she never went over anything!

8. There are no unexpected, um, friends visiting our house.

I’m not referring to human friends; I’m referring to those little friends that are too small to see. Colds, the flu, viruses, and the absolute worst- lice- used to make unexpected appearances in our home. To make matters worse, the school’s lice policy was terrible. They wouldn’t even inform the parents when a classmate was found to have lice because, and I quote, ”It’s not a health issue; it’s a social issue.” Yeah. Try telling that to the mom who has to treat a dozen people and rewash everything in the house. I’m guessing you can tell this is a sore spot with me.

9. I don’t have a million papers being thrust at me every day.

Fundraisers, school pictures, permission slips, PTA notices…oh my word. There were days I honestly used to feel like I was going to have a panic attack. If you think I’m exaggerating, think about it. Take a look at all the papers accumulated for one child multiplied by 10!

10. We can follow our own schedule.

It just makes more sense for our family to learn year-round. A 12 week break can’t be very good for retention. Beyond that, my children need the structure. Even though we have started unschooling, we still have a basic schedule that we follow, and it’s a lifesaver!

We are so blessed to live in a country where we have the opportunity to homeschool our kids. Reasons for this decision may vary, but never forget to take advantage of the freedom that accompanies homeschooling.

Do you homeschool? What were your deciding factors?